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Introducing Cats to Each Other: Tips & Advice
28 Oct 16 - By TheRazzLine - Compilation

Introducing Cats to Each Other: Tips & Advice

We received TONS of advice on introducing a new cat into a home! Thank you for the great tips and good luck!




Old Cat + New Cat = Cat Fight? Maybe not!










If both are males, there will definitely be an issue of territory and they will ensue spraying even if the cats are neutered and had not sprayed before. If both are female, they will be fine as they are not territorial and aloof. If one male and one female, there could be a possibility that the male will spray but usually they just ignore each other because of the female’s aloofness.

In any case it will be a transition for both cats, male or female. If you are going out of town, before you leave sleep with something for a good while that your cat can sleep on or be around after you’re gone. Your scent will calm them down and this is really very important to their well being.

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I've done it a few times and there usually isn't much of a problem. Best way is for both owners to be holding their cat and stand a few feet apart and slowly step closer to see if they'll sniff noses. If not, it’s ok. Put them down if they struggle. They’ll work it out with never more than a few spits, snarls, maybe a whap or two. They will either love each other or avoid each other. Oh, verbally tell each cat before hand what is going to happen.

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If it's 2 unfixed males or one is Siamese it could be a problem.

Don't put them in the same room first off. Keep them in separate rooms where they can sniff each other without seeing each other for a few days at least. Then it’s best to let them see each other without being in the same space, if possible. Create a barrier.
Then let them eat close to each other through the barrier. Then they'll be OK, most likely.

Don't expect them to get along sooner than 1 week, unless they are kittens. If you do these steps you won't have fur flying, or injuries. You will have hissing probably, but that's normal.

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Many years ago I brought a kitten home, only to discover that my other cat was about to eat her alive. :) It was so bad that I had to lock them in separate rooms. After a while I had a friend hold the cat, I held the kitten, and we forced them to confront each other. It seemed to calm down the situation.

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Give your cat a stable place cat away from the other cat, and a climbing post that goes up to about 4-5'.

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Play the song "Stray Cats Strut" on the stereo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoG62Wi8twU as an educational piece for both cats.

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Break out the catnip for both cats.

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Keep the new kitty in a separate room from the other one for a couple days so they can smell each other with the doors closed and the other one coming up to the door naturally.

Bring the new kitty out in a carrier and let them see each other with it protected from the other one - have them both in carriers face to face (not too close) but so they can see each other.

Try that for a day or two for a few minutes at a time. Then, try letting one out with the other in a carrier, and after that let them both out.

It's about gradients. We did this with our grown male kitty to introduce a female kitten and it worked; they got along right away. I was scared he would hurt her but they got along and have been great ever since. I know it can be different with two grown cats.

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What I've heard or read is to keep them in separate rooms for a few hours or days so that they can get used to each other's smells and sounds before putting them together. I would imagine that it would create a mystery sandwich and lead to curiosity.

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I had two cats and I always paid equal attention to them. I got the second cat to keep the first company and he always knew he wasn't my first or favorite; yet he knew I loved him and he was the "best little boy cat in the house", the other was a girl.

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No promises, but this worked with our pit bull and a new kitty. This takes two people: Make sure both are well-restrained in someone’s arms then bring them briefly into the same room and get them about five feet from each other for 10-15 seconds.

Then, bring them into separate rooms, return to the same room a little closer, a little longer. If the dog wants to lunge, tell him a stern NO! If the cat freaks out, talk soothingly to him, then withdraw the animals from eachother again, etc, etc.

When I did this, eventually I was able to place the kitten’s paw on the pit bull’s nose and the dog was just curious about the cat. We did this in one session. I’ve found dogs are more adaptable to change than cats, AND this cat was a kitten.

I’d try to pre-condition both cats by doing this “reach and withdraw” for a few days before they’re thrust together.

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One of our adult cats died, leaving the other cat alone. After a short while we decided to get another adult cat. WELL!!! The original cat (Kameko) was infuriated and would search out the Newbie and holler and scratch and carry on. My husband put them each in their own cat holder, closed the doors and put the holders facing each other so all they could see was each other. He then graduated to having them confined in the same room, with their food and water. Eventually, Kameko calmed down and even though they are not best of friends, they co-exist.

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I have 2 cats and have introduced dogs and cats that I have cared for temporarily. It is a bit challenging to say the least. The best solution I have is to have them in different rooms for a few days and let them gradually get exposed to each other.

If the newbie is kept in a certain room for a few days, it will come to know that space as home and safe. Then when the door is left open for the cats to mingle, it will run to that room to hide and the cats seem to know that and leave it alone. Or at least you can close the door on the newbie and let it have some peace.

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It is better to let cats get acquainted on their own, rather than force the issue. They need to set the pecking order in place and get to know the other's behavior before getting too friendly. That is what I have found when I have introduced other cats in with mine. In time they became the best of friends. But it does take time. No rushing it on the part of us humans.

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I recently saw two cats do this and it worked well. First, you give the new cat a space within the house away from the feeding and litter box area of the other cat. They will divide up the house and on their own they will work it out. Don't try to put their food dishes together at first. Cats are very territorial and this won't go over well.

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Take some article belonging to each cat as a first gradient and introduce it to each other so that they get familiar with the scent. Then, I recommend introducing them via a screen door, etc. so that they can interact but not fight. Note the behavior and if they display aggression.

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I went on Google and typed in the key words “introducing an adult male cat to my adult male cat” and got some great advice. Basically I kept the two cats separated (the new one in a guest bedroom) for several days, then started bringing the new one out in a cat carrier for the other cat to sniff and check out. This went on for a few more days until I let them coexist in the same space and it worked out pretty well. I recommend getting the full sequence on Google.

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I had to move my cat three times with three different situations and a two week house sitting situation in addition to that. What I found was to have my kitty's personal items all to herself in a position away from the other cats, preferably a room to herself. In my case she stayed in the room where I occasionally stayed. She had her water dish, food dish, cat box and her little cat bed.

Each move I placed the items in the room where she would be then brought her in and showed her where each was. She would check each thing out and be just fine. She'd stay in that room until she felt comfortable to come out and visit with the other cats. This worked for another friend that needed to add another cat to her household of four cats.

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I give both cats a treat if both are there at the same time while they are in sight of each other, in fact facing each other, but at whatever distance seems optimum for their comfort level. They always have dry food for the taking, but they only get canned food when they're both there at the same time. There's a cat door, so they can go outside any time. If one is in the kitchen wanting canned food, I look around for the other. They both know the deal and it has made both more tolerant of the other.

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I put the new cat in the bathroom for the 1st couple of days. She was able to meet the other cats under the door. Next, I put the new cat in the living room in a cat carrier. Eventually, I let the new cat out. The other cats sort of tolerated her, but it honestly took about a year for all of them to really get along.

Also, never let your cat outside at least for 2 weeks until it has established the new home as its base. Otherwise it will try to find its way back to your house and perhaps get lost.

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I put the NEW cat in the guest bedroom, keeping it confined in there with his food, water, litter box and toys. My male cat had the run of the house, but he was intensely curious about the new cat and wanted to know about it. For about a week we kept the cats totally separated and watched their behavior, which was basically putting a paw under the door and seeing if they could touch the other cat. Once he seemed okay knowing there was another cat around we’d open the door for awhile, while they got to meet under adult supervision. If there was any aggression or fear we’d go back to just keeping them totally separate.

In the case of the single cat guest, my cat would visit her in her room but she never wanted to come out of the room, and she eventually reunited with her family. My son’s two female cats became quite happy living upstairs with my kitty. They’d stay in the guest bedroom and the guest office (both upstairs). My cat would sleep with me in my upstairs bedroom and spend the days downstairs. They never played together, but they lived together. Once I witnessed my kitty (12 pounds and 11 years old) stealthily walking down the upstairs hallway, pressed against the wall. My son’s smallest cat (7 pounds, 1 year old female) rushed out of her bedroom, chased him, and swatted him playfully on his butt, but he just high-tailed it down the stairs. By not forcing the relationship, I think they would have eventually played together. They just never stayed long enough to do so.

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One thing I've done is take a towel or article of clothing that I've worn or rubbed on me, then rub it on the NEW cat. This transfers my scent to the new guy and the original cat will notice that the new one smells like the owner. I've heard that this helps the older cat feel more secure. Make sure the older cat gets lots of extra love. I don't remember whether a vet told me or who it was but I've used it and it seems to help.

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First, buy a real cheap can of tuna and don't drain it. Open the can and smear tuna juice and some tuna all over both cats. Put them in a small bathroom together and leave until you don't hear any hissing or fighting. You will then open door and find them licking each other in peace. This is not a joke, worked for me!

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